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Vicarious Trauma Education
12 most recent entries

Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-04-03 21:11
Subject:Suicide
Security:Public

Our group is presenting on suicide next week. So I read the chapter in the book, it kind of fits with vicarious trauma.

Page 421:
"Suicide is caused by Psych-ache. The term psych-ache refers to unbearable mental pain that is caused by the frusteration of a person's most important needs, which are unique to each individual. By fulfilling these needs, we find meaning and happiness in life. Suicide has been called "a very bad decision on a very bad day."

Page 412:

"... the suicidal person's mind is not working properly, there is amoment where suicide is no longer a choice..."


Page 411:
Nearly 30,000 people die by suicide every year in the united states, each suicide affects at least six other people. One in three americans have been affected by suicide.



And, a letter from a survivor:

Read Letter HereCollapse )

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:28
Subject:Peer Review Journal Article
Security:Public

http://rsw.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/14/1/27.pdf

Development and Validation of the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:26
Subject:
Security:Public

Impact of trauma work on social work clinicians: empirical findings.



by Maddy Cunningham


A body of research exists on the effect of traumatic events on victims (Briere & Runtz, 1990; Brock & Perry, 1995). However, less attention has been focused on the people indirectly exposed to trauma. As an increasing number of traumatized clients are treated in a variety of settings, interest in the effect of this work on clinicians is growing. Terr (1989) said that indirect exposure to a traumatic event occurs when someone "happens to see the psychiatric symptoms, defenses, and raw emotions that accompany someone else's psychic trauma" (p. 16). Vicarious traumatization characterizes the effect of trauma on clinicians and other professionals who work with trauma survivors. In an effort to provide empirical support for vicarious traumatization, the present study explored the possibility that clinicians may experience reactions associated with traumatic stress as a result of indirect exposure to their client's trauma.

Historically, concepts such as countertransference and burnout have been used to describe the experience of clinicians in the therapeutic process. The classical definition of countertransference focuses on the individual characteristics of the clinician, often assuming that unresolved personal conflicts account for the clinician's reaction (Gorkin, 1987; McCann & Pearlman, 1990; Pearlman & Saakvitne, 1995). Factors frequently cited in the development of burnout include the isolation of the work, the difficult or demanding client, workload, the need to constantly be empathetic, and bureaucratic and administrative factors (Deutsch, 1984; Freudenberger & Robbins, 1979). Neither countertransference nor burnout alone adequately accounts for the impact on the clinician of the graphic material presented by the traumatized client....


http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&se=gglsc&d=5002044978

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:24
Subject:
Security:Public

WORK-RELATED SECONDARY TRAUMATIC STRESS

http://www.ncptsd.va.gov/publications/rq/rqhtml/V8N2.html

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:22
Subject:
Security:Public

Abstract
Having to intervene in severe crises or bearing witness to human tragedy, can take its toll on the individual (Erickson, Vande Kemp, Gorsuch, Hoke & Foy, 2001; Lind, 2000; Lugris, 2000). These effects can include severe, debilitating anxiety that persists for months and sometimes even years following the event. Because these people are not directly involved in the event, their distress often goes undetected (Brady, Guy, Poelstra & Brokaw, 1999; Motta, Joseph, Rose, Suozzi & Leiderman, 1997). Support resources for people who are indirectly affected by a traumatic event are limited. To date, a history of previous trauma, previous psychological well-being, social support, age, gender, educational achievement, socio-economic status and styles of coping have been highlighted as mediating the effects of indirect exposure to a traumatic incident. Understanding this phenomenon and the mechanisms precipitating such distress is an important step in providing appropriate help for a large number of people indirectly affected by tragic events. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/104551908/ABSTRACT

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:20
Subject:
Security:Public

Preventing Vicarious Trauma: What Counselors Should Know When Working with Trauma Survivors

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&se=gglsc&d=5002100146

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-24 12:19
Subject:Peer Review Journal Article
Security:Public

http://www.vawnet.org/DomesticViolence/ServicesAndProgramDev/Administration/PrevVicariousTrauma.pdf

Organizational Prevention of Vicarious Trauma

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-23 12:17
Subject:
Security:Public

Abstract

Within the context of their new constructivist self-development theory, the authors discuss therapists'' reactions to clients'' traumatic material. The phenomenon they term vicarious traumatization can be understood as related both to the graphic and painful material trauma clients often present and to the therapist''s unique cognitive schemas or beliefs, expectations, and assumptions about self and others. The authors suggest ways that therapists can transform and integrate clients'' traumatic material in order to provide the best services to clients, as well as to protect themselves against serious harmful effects.

http://www.springerlink.com/(vs3ehdzelcazqp55poqfibjy)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,9,12;journal,65,73;linkingpublicationresults,1:104759,1

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-22 12:15
Subject:
Security:Public

Vicarious Traumatization, Secondary Traumatic Stress, and Burnout in Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Agency Staff

http://www.extenza-eps.com/SPC/doi/abs/10.1891/vivi.2003.18.1.71;jsessionid=nBfPSIWzG5mcJeDFDM?cookieSet=1&journalCode=vivi

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-21 12:13
Subject:Peer Review Journal Article
Security:Public

http://www.familiesinsociety.org/new/Agencies/PDFsKatrina/82-4Adams.pdf

The Traumatic Stress Institute Belief Scale as a Measure of Vicarious Trauma in a National Sample of … - group of 3 »

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-20 12:12
Subject:
Security:Public

Abstract
Post-traumatic psychiatric reactions to physical trauma are readily acknowledged and accepted. However, there is a relatively new phenomenon of developing similar reactions after providing emergency care to such patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a crisis intervention technique known as group psychological debriefing, which is designed to mitigate the impact of post-traumatic morbidity in individuals exposed to vicarious traumatization. Using adequately controlled, peer-reviewed journal articles and clinical proceedings as the database, 698 subjects from 10 investigations were submitted to a meta-analysis. The results support the effectiveness of group psychological debriefings in alleviating the effects of vicarious psychological distress in emergency care providers. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/65500719/ABSTRACT?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

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Poster:amy_michels
Date:2006-02-19 12:10
Subject:
Security:Public

Abstract

Vicarious trauma (VT) and secondary traumatic stress (STS) or compassion fatigue both describe effects of working with traumatized persons on therapists. Despite conceptual similarities, their emphases differ: cognitive schemas vs. posttraumatic symptoms and burnout, respectively. The TSI Belief Scale (TSI-BSL) measures VT; the Compassion Fatigue Self-Test (CFST) for Psychotherapists measures STS. Neither has substantial psychometric evidence yet, nor has their association been studied. Results for 99 sexual assault and domestic violence counselors show concurrent validity between TSI-BSL and CFST, moderate convergence with burnout but useful discrimination, and strong convergence with general distress, but adequate independent shared variance. Counselors with interpersonal trauma histories scored higher on CFST, but not TSI-BSL or burnout, consistent with the CFST's emphasis on trauma symptomatology.

http://www.springerlink.com/(ap1jkk55vclywjrma2a0ixfz)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,11,13;journal,13,73;linkingpublicationresults,1:104759,1

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